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APA 7th Edition Referencing Guide1

A Wintec Library guide to referencing in APA 7th edition style

Using your own images, tables or graphs

You do not need to reference any images, graphs, or tables you have created, or any photos you have taken. However, as your tutor may not know where the image or photo came from, it is good practice to indicate that you provided it. However, this is not necessary for tables or graphs.

The best place to do this is underneath your media. There is no reference list entry required.

Example for a written assignment

Figure 1

Sheep in Paddock

(Photograph supplied by author).

Note
For a visual presentation, like PowerPoint, no figure number or image title is required.

Referencing a table (reproduced in assignment)

A table can be referenced in much the same way as an image or figure whose creator is uncredited—i.e., by referencing the source in which the table appears. For example:

Author, A. (Date). Title of journal article: Subtitle in sentence case. Title of Journal in Italic Title Case, volume number(issue number), page range. https://doi.org/123.456.789

West, R. (2006). Catastrophic pathways to smoking cessation: Findings from national survey. British Medical Journal, 332(7539), 458–460. 
https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.38723.573866.AE

Example

Table 1

Success Rates of Planned and Unplanned Quit Attempts

(West, 2006, p. 459)

Note
Because the table caption contains the information an in-text citation would normally have, you can simply refer to the relevant figure in the body of your assignment (as below).

 

Reference list entry

West, R. (2006). Catastrophic pathways to smoking cessation: Findings from national survey. British Medical Journal, 332(7539), 458–460. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.38723.573866.AE

In-text citations

Page/paragraph numbers are optional for paraphrased information.

 

Narrative
Table 1 contrasts the success rates...

Parenthetical
... of planned  and unplanned quit attempts (Table 1).


Table with multiple citations

If you need to cite several cells or pieces of information within the table, you can use a footnote system:

Note
The footnotes serve as your in-text citation. However, you will need to give a full reference for each citation. See Referencing a table (reproduced in an assignment) above for examples.

Referencing an image from a resource for a written assignment (in which the image creator is not the author)

For referencing an image from a resource for a visual presentation, see here.

The following example shows how to reference an image from a resource in which the images are credited to a separate creator, illustrator, or photographer who is NOT listed as one of the main contributors/authors of the work.

In the in-text citation, the image creator is referenced as a secondary citation: (Image creator, in Author, Year, page number). See below for an example underneath an image.

Example of image taken from a book

Author, A. (Date). Title of book: Subtitle in italic sentence case. Publisher.

Savage, S. (2014). Mixing and mastering in the box: The guide to making great mixes and final masters on your computer. Oxford University Press.

Example - in-text citation

Figure 2

Three-Dimensional Mixing Metaphor


(Fergusson, in Savage, 2014, p. 254)

Note
Because the image caption contains the information an in-text citation would normally have, you can simply refer to the relevant figure in the body of your assignment (as below).

 

In-text citations

Narrative
Figure 2 shows the different components of a mixer...

Parenthetical
... up to four instruments (see Figure 2).


Referencing an image from a resource for a written assignment (in which the image creator is not named)

For referencing an image from a resource for a visual presentation, see here.

When referencing an image from a resource in which the images are NOT credited to a separate creator or illustrator, simply reference the resource in which the image was published. For example:

Author, A. or Corporate Author. (Date). Title of resource: Subtitle in italic sentence case. Publisher.

Herlihy, B. (2014). The human body in health and illness. Elsevier.

Example from a website

Figure 5

CRAAP Test Graphic

(Wintec, n.d.)

Note
Because the image caption contains the information an in-text citation would normally have, you can refer to the relevant figure in the body of your assignment as below:

 

Reference list entry

Wintec. (n.d.). Critical evaluation of sourceshttps://libguides.wintec.ac.nz/Library_research_skills/critical_evaluation_of_sources 

In-text citations

Narrative
Figure 5 explains the steps in the acronym CRAAP.

Parenthetical
... purpose of the information, according to the acronym CRAAP (see Figure 5).

 

Example from a book

Figure 3

Muscles of the Head and Neck

(Herlihy, 2014, p. 160)

Note
Because the image caption contains the information an in-text citation would normally have, you can refer to the relevant figure in the body of your assignment as below:

 

Reference list entry

Herlihy, B. (2014). The human body in health and illness. Elsevier.

In-text citations

Narrative
Figure 3 depicts the muscles of the head and neck.

Parenthetical
... known as the Zygomaticus (see Figure 3).

 


Using Google Images

To avoid breaching copyright, follow these steps:

1. Search for the image you want in Google images

2. Click on Tools

3. Click on usage rights

4. Click on Creative Commons license

5. Click on the image you want, then License details to check your ability to use it. Click on Get this image on to locate the image at the original URL.

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